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DEVELOPMENT OF THE LOGO

Origin and today:
Our logo and brand symbol, the Felix Schoeller tower, originally served as a windmill for the generation of electricity. Today we use our tower as a museum and place for holding events at our company headquarters in Osnabrück.

left
  • 1895
  • 1910 – 1920
  • 1921 – 1950
  • 1925
  • 1951 – 1970
  • 1971 – 1993
  • 1994 – 2011
  • 2012
  • 1895

    The company has Felix Hermann Maria Schoeller to thank for the first version of the logo, which arose through the founding of the company.

  • 1910 – 1920

    The tower is printed on a book of samples for the first time, in 1910. Here it is still a very naturalistically drawn silhouette framed by a decorative wood.

  • 1921 – 1950

    Up until 1950 a series of different variations of the tower symbol emerge which can scarcely be distinguished from one another. The main change that occurs is the surrounding edge with the circle of writing.

  • 1925

    In 1925, the tower appears in this form for the first time, on letterheads. The logo shows a tower that widens at the base, standing on a hill surrounded by what are now stylised shrubs.

  • 1951 – 1970

    The new start after the Second World War also influences the new design of the logo in 1950. For the first photokina in Cologne, the tower is shown in white on a black background following the contrast inversion in the photographic process. As this design is a bit sombre, at the second photokina the company moves away from this again.

  • 1971 – 1993

    The forerunners of the logo are replaced in 1970 by Munich-based graphic designer Franz Wischnewski’s new version. This is used until 1979 and is given its current form, a red outline and red circle.

  • 1994 – 2011

    Whilst there have been many different versions of the tower and whilst it was not given central importance in communications initially, it is used as a logo from the time that the company is founded. As a result it is one of the oldest and the few really enduring trademarks of German advertising history.

  • 2012

    As part of a Corporate Design overhaul the red tone of the tower is made a shade darker to symbolise value. At the same time, the tower is consistently integrated in all logos of business activities of the Felix Schoeller Group to strengthen the logo and in line with a consistent global branding policy.

right
1895

1895

The company has Felix Hermann Maria Schoeller to thank for the first version of the logo, which arose through the founding of the company.

1910 – 1920

1910 – 1920

The tower is printed on a book of samples for the first time, in 1910. Here it is still a very naturalistically drawn silhouette framed by a decorative wood.

1921 – 1950

1921 – 1950

Up until 1950 a series of different variations of the tower symbol emerge which can scarcely be distinguished from one another. The main change that occurs is the surrounding edge with the circle of writing.

1925

1925

In 1925, the tower appears in this form for the first time, on letterheads. The logo shows a tower that widens at the base, standing on a hill surrounded by what are now stylised shrubs.

1951 – 1970

1951 – 1970

The new start after the Second World War also influences the new design of the logo in 1950. For the first photokina in Cologne, the tower is shown in white on a black background following the contrast inversion in the photographic process. As this design is a bit sombre, at the second photokina the company moves away from this again.

1971 – 1993

1971 – 1993

The forerunners of the logo are replaced in 1970 by Munich-based graphic designer Franz Wischnewski’s new version. This is used until 1979 and is given its current form, a red outline and red circle.

1994 – 2011

1994 – 2011

Whilst there have been many different versions of the tower and whilst it was not given central importance in communications initially, it is used as a logo from the time that the company is founded. As a result it is one of the oldest and the few really enduring trademarks of German advertising history.

2012

2012

As part of a Corporate Design overhaul the red tone of the tower is made a shade darker to symbolise value. At the same time, the tower is consistently integrated in all logos of business activities of the Felix Schoeller Group to strengthen the logo and in line with a consistent global branding policy.